welcome!

Whether you've reached this blog willingly or by force I'm happy to have you here.
ersi marina's workroom is always open to the public, even when I am not in. Sometimes I need to sleep.
And to paint.
And to play with my four cats.
My name is Ersi Marina and I live in Spain though I was born and grew up in Athens, Greece. I kept it all very Mediterranean.
This blog is a means to share my work and snippets of my life, as well as to be in contact with you all. I hope you'll enjoy your visit.

Sunday, 9 February 2014

the un-meeting with the gallerist

I've been procrastinating (definitely need to look up the etymology of this word) for several days but now the time has come to tell you about the meeting with the gallerist last Sunday, 2 February. It's yet another dark day, not too cold but quite wintery, so opening my blog's window to the world is like a flash of warm light in my attic workspace.

strips of Kozo paper and shreds of scrim
14 cms wide x 10 cms high ( 5.6" x 4") approx.

Since the meeting was strange enough to be called an un-meeting (Alice in Wonderland-style) I don't mind illustrating this entry with some of my work that has nothing to do with painting. Or doesn't it? Anyway, what you will see here are some of the paper bowls I made last December for the Art Market. Taking nice photographs has been a challenge in this endless series of dark days and lots of editing was necessary to compensate light, texture, definition, etc.


So. A few artists of the area were going to meet with the gallerist last Sunday morning. We were all looking forward to it. I spent the entire morning/noon waiting for her to appear. I skipped lunch so I could fully dedicate myself to waiting. At three o'clock in the afternoon I finally had a couple of toasts with butter and fig marmelade, mmm, delicious. A second breakfast of sorts. And then went on waiting.


At five o'clock I got a phone call from one of the other artists asking me if I could take my work to their house, a short 6 km drive from home, by around seven. No problem, I said. I put everything in a folder and off I went.

inside crudely painted with acrylic gesso

The gallerist finally showed up at half past seven. We were all very curious and a bit tired by then. To make up for the delay, the gallerist arrived accompanied by her son. The new gallerist! A twenty-something young man with a very serious countenance and a very low-waist pair of blue jeans. I confess that their dénouement had me intrigued for quite a while.

different bowl, same materials: strips of Kozo paper and shreds of scrim
16 cms wide x 8 cms high ( 6.4" x 3.2") approx.

As it turned out, the Gallerist Mother is turning over the business to the Gallerist Heir. We took turns in showing them our work. Rafa's photography, Silvia's paintings and installations, and my watercolours and mixed media pieces. The Heir looked long and hard, he studied the array of artworks and photographs thereof and reached a decision. 'Off with their heads!' he cried.


Then he solemnly stated that he was looking for higher quality art. He straightened his back and stretched his neck so high that I thought those pants were definitely going down. They didn't. They were high quality jeans.


I felt quite frustrated, because the Gallerist Mother did like many of the artworks she saw and most of mine. 'I wouldn't dismiss this one', she whispered again and again. So, if she weren't retiring, us poor artists would stand a chance. But she is retiring. And the Gallerist Heir only appreciates realistic, representational art. Traditional landscapes, portraits and still lifes. He proudly informed us that he was planning to visit ARCO, the most important contemporary art event in Spain, celebrated annually in February.

I'd love to go with him. His pants will definitely go down there.

P.S. I have more paper bowls but I'll leave them for a future entry. These two are probably my favourites. White on white, right? And they are quite strong, considering that they are made of paper and scrim. They can hold keys, jewellery, little decorative stones or beads, walnuts, etc. You can clean them with a soft, wet cloth.

P.P.S. I hope you'll forgive my sarcasm in this entry. No names are mentioned, no identities disclosed. Only statuses and heights.

P.P.P.S. There is nothing wrong with representational art and there are many realistic artists whose work I admire. The conceit though, I don't.

14 comments:

  1. I love your sarcasm and rightly so...how many hours did they keep you waiting!?...7 or 8! My thought is that a better opportunity with a gallerist who understands and appreciates your beautiful pieces is right around the corner.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Julie! I hope you are right :) In this case, it wasn't so much the disappointment of not having a gallerist interested in my work as the anger at his attitude. Being an art gallerist requires a considerable skill in public relations. If he treats people the way he treated us, I can foresee a very short future for his venture.

      He kept me waiting for 8 long hours, btw.

      Delete
  2. I know it is a bit like the fox and sour grapes, but truly, I think you will find you would not have liked working with him.
    I suspect, too, the Dowager Gallery Owner is sad to see her hard work and visions altering.
    Sandy in the UK
    (from ALAW)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dowager indeed, he he! You're right, I wouldn't like working with this particular Heir. His mother was mostly quiet but I would give more than one penny for her thoughts. Thanks, Sandy.

      Delete
  3. Ooooffffff. That sounds like a difficult day. And a long one. Heir Gallerist will soon run that gallery into the ground if he continues to be so rude to the people he depends upon for his job; the artists. I hope you find someone more in tune with your vision.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. After the Royal Gallerists left we considered betting on how long that wonderful boy would be in business :) If he recovers from the shock of visiting ARCO, that is! Thank you, Jan.

      Delete
  4. It has been observed by wiser men that oversized egos and pretensions invariably lead to the downfall of those carrying them.Not to mention jeans!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha ha! Those jeans and the way he wore them did have something artistic about them, in a 'theatre of the absurd' way. I'll try to stay informed about the Heir's fate and fortune, and will tell you all about it.

      Delete
  5. Before I forget - in my indignation on behalf of you, your local fellow artists & all artists - I wanted to compliment you on the beautiful bowls (not to mention your photo-editing skills - it looks like there's plenty of light!). Using the lovely bowls was a surreal-ly beautiful way to illustrate the tale of your frustrating & disappointing day. It's destined to become one of those "amusing" stories you tell once you're working with a more desirable/professional gallerist. I thought you told the story wonderfully well, & with more humor than I likely could have managed.
    P.S. Maybe the mother/soon-to-be-former gallerist could recommend other more suitable gallerists?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so happy you like the bowls, Lisa, thanks very much! There's plenty more to investigate and play in this series. I only need the calm that sparks creativity.

      The tale of the gallerist is already becoming an amusing memory. I even feel for him, with all the unpleasant surprises that await him in his job, that he clearly does not understand. His mother kept my business card, maybe that's a good sign. I suspect she won't be able to retire completely if she wants her business to keep afloat.

      Delete
  6. Ersi - I loved your take and reflections on this. It was so eloquent and elegant I almost forgot how sad it was. Like others, you know that you are better off without him and he will definitely lose the troos somewhere soon, but I feel a bit sad for his mother; who probably knows a bit about what appeals to different folk. Above all, i can't bear the rudeness of it all -it is just plain wrong to treat folk that way. Anyhow, keep making gorgeous bowls and things!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much, Fiona! His mother is probably doing some serious thinking about the future of the gallery in the hands of the Heir. He is too young and too ignorant to understand that his livelihood depends on the artists he looks down upon. I hate rudeness too and that's what sparked my indignation. There was no guarantee that our work would appeal to them but his attitude was an unpleasant surprise.

      Delete
  7. I am totally impressed with your humorous and cutting recount of what must have been a terribly frustrating encounter. A very creative response to an utterly dismal lack of regard for others. My utmost respect for your good grace and my sympathies to the Dowager.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Robyn! I guess that day's events awakened the rebel in me and she can be quite caustic when she feels provoked :) Maybe I'll be able to squeeze some of that 'good grace' in my Personal Histories book? I do appreciate your words.

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...