welcome!

Whether you've reached this blog willingly or by force I'm happy to have you here.
ersi marina's workroom is always open to the public, even when I am not in. Sometimes I need to sleep.
And to paint.
And to play with my four cats.
My name is Ersi Marina and I live in Spain though I was born and grew up in Athens, Greece. I kept it all very Mediterranean.
This blog is a means to share my work and snippets of my life, as well as to be in contact with you all. I hope you'll enjoy your visit.

Wednesday, 16 April 2014

japanese dish

Here's me again with my gelli prints. I just can't stop printing, apparently. There are a couple of serious pieces I need to do but I keep postponing them. I have become a gelprintingplateaholic! (Ok, that almost sounds like supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, I'm very proud of it.)

Note: I had to embed these images from my Flickr photostream because, for some reason, Blogger showed the backgrounds gray and I hated that. As a result, I cannot centre the images. No problem, right?

Japanese Dish
gelli printing and graphite on 250 gsm Stonehenge paper



This single piece took me two days to finish. Fitting the two colour templates together was extremely difficult for me, I had to throw several trial prints away. Eventually, I started asking myself why on earth I suddenly wanted such a perfect print and the only answer I could come up with is that I needed to create at least one smooth, non-blotty, non-bleedy print. I finally managed it.

the perfect print

 
As you can see here, the forms and lines match perfectly. I had triumphed! But I had also killed the work.

Perfection is not very interesting, is it? No blobs, no play, not a hair out of place. So what could I do to bring my Japanese Dish back to life? I needed two days to figure it out. The final result is the first image. I think that thick, wavy line did the trick. That and a couple of tiny dots on each side. Of course I could always change my mind tomorrow and think it's worthless but I probably won't. It's finished, it's simple and it may well be the last perfect print I'll ever try to pull again.


I titled it 'Japanese Dish' after this fractal that I created a long time ago. It's probably my absolute favourite of all the fractals I did back then. The forms for the print were taken from this fractal, though simplified.

The Exhibition Hall will open on Friday, Saturday and Sunday and I'll be working there from 11:00 - 13:30 and from 17:30 - 20:00 in the evening. I'll probably be able to go online there for a while but, in case I can't, enjoy your Easter holidays!

14 comments:

  1. I like your final "adjusted perfection" piece very much,Ersi.

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    1. Oh, thank you! After all the difficulties, it's good to know that it comes through nicely :)

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  2. LOVE the colors and the style!

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    1. How wonderful, thank you Sue! I think I'll try perfect printing again when I get a proper press though :))

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  3. Not sure how you pulled it off without the blobs etc! Really simply and lovely. I would never know that it was a gelliplate print. Looks like a serigraph.

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    1. I don't know if I can explain how I pulled it off! I used a brayer with a very smooth surface and two templates, one on top of the other. I removed the first after printing one colour and, since the second was already underneath, already in place, I managed a perfect matching of the edges. I'm sure there's a simpler way of doing that but I still haven't read any tutorials so I had to improvise. If it looks like serigraphy though, I consider it a great success! Thanks, Julie!

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  4. really love these latest works ... nicely done ... i am in the process of waiting waiting for my studio to be finished and am itching to get to work ... these just make me feel even more angstee ... lovely work ... (i have linked to it on my blog this evening please let me know if you dont like that kind of thing and i will remove) ... kind regards >>> Gina http://ginaseye.blogspot.com.au/

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    1. I love being featured in your blog so please don't remove it! Thank you very much for linking to my work, that's very generous of you. I'll tweet about it and mention it in my next blog entry.

      I hope your studio is finished soon, so you can get to work. If you feel like giving a try to gelli printing, all you need is a small working surface and running water to clean your plate after printing.

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  5. Happy Easter to you. The prints are really successful,worth the effort.

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    1. Thank you, Jackie! I am looking into ways of diversifying my prints a bit, hope I won't get carried away.

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  6. Lovely, Ersi! Get carried away if you need to...

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    1. Lol, thank you Carol! I think I already did and now I'm thinking about creating prints that I will not consider trials any more.

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  7. bonjour from province of quebec, i loved your work,the precsion of it.tell me i see a small embossing of a square form in pale green(at least on my screen) did you pass it throught a traditionnal press before adding the gold ribbons?and are the black lines added "a main levée" as we say in french.i am very admirative of how you put that together because i am struggleing in those kind of steps also.
    merci for sharing.

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    1. Hello Quebec! Thanks very much for the comment. Let's see, I'll try to explain. My gelli print only appears in the first two images: 1. The final work 2. The print before adding the graphite.

      The last image is of a fractal (digital-genarated art) that I created some years ago and has nothing to do with printing. Aside from having it printed digitally, of course.

      I did not use a traditional press (I don't have one) and if you see any pale green or embossing in the first two images, it's just an effect on your screen.

      Achieving the precision you see here was a lot of work and I doubt that I'll try again with my gelli plate. I'll wait till I can have a press comme il faut. :)

      The black wavy line you can see in the first picture was indeed made a main levée. I used a carpenter's pencil (at least that's what we call it in Spain) and drew the line after placing the paper on a textured surface. That's why it looks grainy.

      I hope this helps! I'm thrilled you like this work and I would be happy to help with any other questions you may have, limited as my knowledge still is.

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