welcome!

Whether you've reached this blog willingly or by force I'm happy to have you here.
ersi marina's workroom is always open to the public, even when I am not in. Sometimes I need to sleep.
And to paint.
And to play with my four cats.
My name is Ersi Marina and I live in Spain though I was born and grew up in Athens, Greece. I kept it all very Mediterranean.
This blog is a means to share my work and snippets of my life, as well as to be in contact with you all. I hope you'll enjoy your visit.

Wednesday, 23 April 2014

painting with a gelli plate

Am I becoming a single-issue blogger? Don't answer that, I know I am, going on and on about my gelli prints and how much fun I am having with them. Though there is something more than fun to them.

Gina, a lovely blogger from Tasmania, featured my prints in her blog the other day: Gina's eye - Visual Artist. I was really delighted with the feature and it was a great surprise! Thanks again, Gina, for your generosity. There are many interesting features as well as Gina's own works of art and poetry in her blog, hop over to see for yourselves.

gel print and random brushstrokes with india ink
on 250 gsm Stonehenge paper

Through my gel plate I have access to a technique I had scarcely tried before. I am not a printer and I don't have a press. I never seriously studied printing techniques and the few things I knew, I had forgotten by now.

Till the plate was served to me.

What started out (and still is) a game seems to be opening up many new possibilities. In fact, I have made very little progress since I started. I am exploring the options at my own pace, which is usually slow. I feel free when I am not pressed for time or results and creativity can only come from freedom, I think.

I didn't use a brayer for any of these prints, I applied the acrylics with a wet brush. There is a tricky balance between using too much water (it almost happened on the blue background here) and too little. With too little water the colours remain too opaque and cover the paper completely. In exchange, you can use that to create a thick brushstroke texture that prints flat on the paper but retains the bristle details.

You will be able to see all that clearly if you click on the images to enlarge them.

double gel print and graphite
on 250 gsm Stonehenge paper 

As you can see, I started experimenting with more colour and less delicacy. This particular print makes me want to giggle, not sure why. It doesn't necessarily indicate that I started following a different path or style (or does it?) but it's certainly a different step on my way. Black and red and blue? Not my usual colours, too bold a contrast for me and yet, I'm very fond of it.

single gel print and graphite
on 250 gsm Stonehenge paper

I pulled this one as a vertical print but then looked at it horizontally and found myself neck-high in a field of tall grass. I liked the feeling and worked from there. A gelli print nature of sorts.

single gel print and graphite
on 150 gsm Stonehenge paper

Still surrounded by tall grass and a few unidentified vegetables. I mixed too much yellow-green-blue in this case and had to pull two more prints to use up the colours. They are not finished yet, so expect yet another post on gelli printing. Moving towards mixed media though, thinking about different combinations, larger sizes, whatever. Oh, dear. I'll be needing an A3-sized gel plate soon!

20 comments:

  1. I like what you are doing with the plate. I especially like the large amount of white space around the first one. I love my plate and find it to be a wonderful challenge.

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    1. It is exactly that, a wonderful challenge! So much more than a textured background generator. I'm so pleased you like these prints, thank you Roberta.

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  2. I really like your red, black & blue print, Ersi! I think you are heading down a really interesting path with these. I'm certainly looking forward to where you go from here.

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    1. To be honest, I hadn't felt such a wide path of new possibilites in front of me for quite some time. The ideas are still a bit chaotic but they'll eventually become clear and I'll follow them. It's really exciting!

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  3. Still am amazed by all the gorgeous images you are finding with you gelli plate Ersi. Love that first image in particular. One day I will take mine out of its wrapping and have a go. In the mean time it just sits there waiting be be useful!

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    1. I'd love to know if this simple tool can be as enjoyable for you as it is for me, Susan. I mean, you have the real thing, the press and your beautiful experience with it. I'm thrilled you like my printies though, it's very encouraging, thank you!

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  4. You deserve you 'fame', as you have made it your own! It shows that there is always more to discover with the gelli plate. I made a real gelatine plate for a workshop I am leading this weekend. I wonder how long it will last. In some ways it is better, more sensitive.

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    1. Oh, I'd love to be able to attend your workshop! I wish I were able to create my own gel plates, then I'd make a really big one, A2-sized probably. I hope you'll blog about the workshop and the prints created there. Thanks, Jackie!

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  5. Χριστός Ανέστη Mαρίνα! Χρόνια πολλά!

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    1. Χριστός Ανέστη και καλή Πρωτομαγιά πια σχεδόν! Και να ζήσουν οι Μαρίνες :)

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  6. As much as I loved your rust work from last summer, when I look at your prints, one thought keeps running thru my mind. THIS is what you were meant to do. The piece in this post and the last are exquisite.

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    1. Thank you! It's funny that you'd say that, because I feel so comfortable with printing. I'm still not sure if it's printing in general or just the easy fun of the gel plate. One thing I know, I'm not done with printing yet.

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  7. How lovely these are - and how great to see them evolving! That first one is my favourite, but all are fascinating.

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    1. I jumped from the greys and sombers to colour and bristle-play :) I guess I need to explore every possibility. More are on the way, thank you Charlton!

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  8. Oh Ersi, I just love it when we have that falling in love moment, that obsession, that total focus on exploring and working with one thing! This is great to watch and follow - I still like the grey ones; but the bright colours are definitely fun!

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    1. Fiona, thank you! Every day I have to make an effort to avoid going back to the greys. I eventually will but why not play with the colours for a while? Be a child again :)

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  9. You're having some fabulous results here. They have quite a 'japanese' feel to them, very calligraphic. It's wonderful to see you exploring, and being excited, and making such great work. Looking forward to seeing more XXX

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    1. Thank you so much, Jan! I am indeed excited with this technique and also with your wonderful comments, that I am grateful about. I think I'll try new things with my gelli plate and I can't wait to show them to you!

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  10. Like you I am interested in the use of the Gelli plate for more than just making pretty paper. I love it when I find a blog like yours. Thanks.

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    1. Thank you for the comment and for appreciating my work!

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